Deploy a Really Awful Toyi-toyi!


South Africans perfected
The Wanna-Weewee dance –
Performance is effected
At  every given chance.

Invented in Zimbabwe,
But one can understand it
Why dear old Mu-ga-be
Then summarily banned it.

It indicates unrest –
Such things in Zim just cannot be!
Arrest was thought as best
To stamp the stamping out, you see.

Here, students want to show
How much they are unhappy?
They prance so you will know
They need a change of nappy.

And workers, on the whole,
(Or in, as miners’ case may be)
Don’t simply take a stroll,
But stomp about ecstatically.

They think that this will bring
Some loot from coffers running dry,
So logic is a thing
They lack the wit to give a try.

Thus, all that they achieve
Is loss of what they might have had;
They finally receive
Much less, in all; oh well, too bad.

With all the floppy flab
That flaps around, the while they dance,
Indeed they need to grab,
For exercising, every chance.

But still, what comes to mind
While witnessing this antic
Is that need to toilet find
Must be what drives them frantic.

I was born into an ‘upper-middle-class’ family, as one of the privileged race, before and during Apartheid. We fell into hard times, though, and not only was I unable to go to university but I had to leave school early to supplement the family income. It didn’t occur to me to gather a group of buddies and go dancing in the street, causing disruptions to the public who were actually producing something, and trashing things here and there just for fun, in order to rectify this.

It did occur to me to carry on obtaining qualifications at my own expense. That took me a long time, but I finally attained professional qualifications through the Institute, and then a BA through Unisa (University of South Africa) at the Durban campus pictured here.

Unisa 2

We also had the children to worry about, on limited funds. Even though the government schools were at a higher standard than now, a private school education seemed the best way to go. We managed, somehow. Then it was university for the two of them. Once more, it was all managed without stomping and whooping. Now, the same process has, and will, apply to two batches of grandchildren

If you gain the impression that I am not terribly sympathetic towards the ‘I want’ generation, you have got it in one.

© Colonialist October 2015 (WordPress)
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About colonialist

Active septic geranium who plays with words writing fantasy novels and professionally editing, with notes writing classical music, and with riding a mountain bike, horses and dinghies.
This entry was posted in Africa, Current Affairs, Humorous rhyme, Humour, Really Awful Rhyme, Satire, Wordplay and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

30 Responses to Deploy a Really Awful Toyi-toyi!

  1. Ditto. Whoever with common sense ever said temper tantrums were attractive, useful, or productive?
    Here, they burn down their own homes, and communities and then demand the government/taxpayers rebuild for them – and once that’s done , they burn it all again. Indulged and spoiled – and unwillingly funded by what is stolen from those who work hard and have many times of doing without.

    Like

  2. I agree with you. When I was a college student, I worked hard and took both every success and failure as a personal responsibility. As a college professor, the attitude I saw in too many of my students was that if they failed, it was my fault. I also saw a stubborn “go ahead, I dare you to try and teach me” attitude. Very frustrating! Higher education is such a gift not to be squandered or taken for granted.

    Like

  3. Ruth2Day says:

    nicely put. I think the revolt is more about having fun and not taking the studying seriously. Sadly many students want to complete their education and are being disrupted by what is going on.

    Like

    • colonialist says:

      Unfortunately, too, it gives these young people a sense of importance to be involved in such activities without having the maturity to assess things properly. There is also the human tendency to follow like lemmings, which seems to be as prevalent among the brighter members of society as it is with uneducated masses.

      Liked by 2 people

  4. Arkenaten says:

    While I can understand the idea of industrial action, I always thought this was the whole point of a union, to negotiate on behalf of the workers that pay the salaries of the union officials.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Arkenaten says:

      I should have added … ”while the workers carry on with their job.”

      Liked by 1 person

    • colonialist says:

      I was, in my time, also involved in trade union activities and negotiations. Principles which applied then, and seem to have been forgotten completely, were that industrial action was a last resort, used only when what was felt to be reasonable demands were utterly refused; and that in all negotiations cognisance had to be taken of the longer-term welfare of the employer and their ability to grow and to afford improved benefits to staff. It is a trade-off of the profits which will keep the shareholders happy against paying well for the performance leading to those profits. Fundamental, but how much of that comes anywhere near present trade unionism?

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      • Arkenaten says:

        I wouldn’t know, Mister N.
        My only experience with unionism was when Mrs. Thatcher apparently broke the back of the Miner’s Union in the seventies.
        We endured Power Cuts for a short while but then it was back to normal.

        Like

        • colonialist says:

          In my opinion, Maggie did a good job there. The unions had become too powerful and demanding, and were exploiting the poor employers. The pendulum needed to go back in the ‘exploiting the workers’ direction.

          Liked by 1 person

  5. 68ghia says:

    You say that they don’t accomplish anything with the tantrums they throw – they do. They grind the whole country to a halt, demolish any progress there might have been and, after all that, they still get their way. Way too much like spoilt kids. My son is still paying off his student loans – he’s never thrown a tantrum about it and I would have something to say about it if he does – you work for what you want – it does not fall from the sky!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. libraschild says:

    i cant believe almost all campuses are now involved. I see tukkies shut down their campus at 3am today to stop people destroying anything

    Like

  7. Stephanie Haahjem says:

    Couldn’t agree more! Also loved the poem!

    Like

  8. Colline says:

    A perfect poem to express what so many of us think when we see the toyi toyi dance.

    Like

  9. Sou dit nie wonderlik wees as alle onderwys gratis kon wees nie?

    Like

  10. Forgot to say how much I enjoyed reading your poem to C, who also thought it was really good. 🙂

    Like

  11. Hear hear!! This ANC government are in power because they made rash promises of everything for free. It’s time they started to tell the truth to the ‘entitled’ masses. Nothing is for nothing.

    Like

  12. Pussycat44 says:

    Col, we knew where we stood in those days. We were five children in a working class family. Only one child had tertiary education (moi) thanks to a student loan which was paid back by three years of compulsory teaching. The other siblings got by with their jobs through years of experience and attending courses. The ruling party, right from the beginning, promised all sorts of things for Mahala and the populace is holding them to it. I hate the toiy-toiy-ing, it looks so primitive, nevermind the trashing of places and the burning down of schools, buses etc.

    Liked by 2 people

    • colonialist says:

      We did, indeed. Nothing was simply dished out on a plate.
      What is really ironic is that the people now indulging in this primitive behaviour are supposed to be the intelligentsia. Really? Baboons tend to act far more responsibly.

      Like

  13. I’m with you there – my history in England was not dissimilar from yours – I was 72 before I gained my degree, and we incurred years of debt in order to educate our children properly. I have never understood how going on strike achieved anything other than to cripple whole industries putting thousands out of work. I love the idea of a wanna-weewee dance.

    Liked by 1 person

    • colonialist says:

      That was dogged persistence, indeed. Really well done.
      People have totally lost the plot on strikes. They are not meant to be public disturbances, but merely a demonstration of how valuable the services of the striking individuals are, and the effect withdrawal of them has.
      Seeing these wee-wee individuals bouncing on one leg with the other held up does SO remind one of someone desperately waiting outside a door marked ‘Occupied’.

      Liked by 1 person

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