Water Really Awful Pity.


Portapool

A really good rain
Off roof down the drain …
I’m thinking a thank
That we need a tank
As most modern way
With water to stay.

(Though it is the truth,
When I was a youth,
With tanks we got by
As only supply;
Thus now I’ve just thunk
Our ‘progress’ is bunk.)

Pool cannot refill,
At least, not until
Dam water supply
Gets back to a high;
And backwash can’t do
Unless rains come through.

tanks drums buckets etc

So, till I can get
Big tanks for the wet
I’ll have to make do
With small ones, a few,
For backwash, and then
To pump back again.

At bottom of drum
The dirt will now come,
So then I can pop
A pipe from the top
That water to suck
Which hasn’t got muck.

jug filter

A bit of a flap:
How leaves I can trap?
The glorified jug
Can keep them all snug,
And pump weir’s kept clear
By this ‘handy’ gear.

And now when it rains
I will be at pains
Most tankful to be,
With conservancy –
If rains overfill,
We’ll save it, not spill!

© January 2016 Colonialist (WordPress)
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About colonialist

Active septic geranium who plays with words writing fantasy novels and professionally editing, with notes writing classical music, and with riding a mountain bike, horses and dinghies.
This entry was posted in Africa, Personal Journal, Really Awful Rhyme and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to Water Really Awful Pity.

  1. gipsika says:

    Water conun-drum!
    Col, you being so close to the largest body of water on Earth, why not put salt water in the pool? You could (technically, I don’t know if you really could) fish up water from the sea and put it into the pool, and … am I making any sense at all?
    Anyway I’m with you about the tyranny of the State forbidding people to have what is above and beneath the place where they live – e.g. a diamond you find in your backyard is automatically Oppenheimer’s (don’t let your wife lose her engagement ring in the garden!).
    Here’s what gets me about the “world water crisis”. (Not counting drought-stricken regions who have a problem right here, right now, but the generalized “crisis” so-called world-wide.) Water is not a scarce resource. Clean water is. It’s not a water crisis; it’s a pollution crisis, with the fracking companies and their ilk being the top perpetrators.
    My father has vivid memories from childhood, on a farm in SWA, pumping water because the windmotor was not going (because of no wind). Still I feel it should not be too difficult to home-rig such a contraption. Also, there are ways to cheat the electricity bill, by a solar water heater (simple black plastic piping on the roof through which the water gets piped, and it lies baking in the sun for free). A friend of mine, ecology professor Erik Holm, demonstrated both a solar oven built from tin foil, and a cooling room that was almost as effective as a fridge, that was a brick building plastered with raw porous cement which they sprayed wet when they wanted the inside to cool down (the wind & evaporation caused a pretty freeze inside that room). Going off (most of) the grid can be a sneaky action. Solar-fed lanterns are the next step. I’m with Ark, one can do it stepwise while keeping some things on the municipal water and lights grid. Seeing that Eskom is showing us the soft route into going off the grid slowly, by their repeated, non-critical, patient power failures, I feel we all ought to take the chance given to us.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Arkenaten says:

    Having a borehole is such an incredible asset that I think after all these years I would be lost without it.

    Like

    • colonialist says:

      You must be the envy of all. We had one in the Midlands -super. Trouble was, it had an electric pump, so no power no water as well. Well, that is to say the water stayed well down in the well, and all was not well.

      Like

      • Arkenaten says:

        This does happen , of course, when the moonsipaly-paly decides we need to experience the genuine rural lifestyle, just as one is about to cook dinner.
        But it has been a lifeline when the same moomoosillypaly can’t send a repair crew out when a pipe bursts and there is more water flowing down the street than the Rivers of Babylon.

        Like

        • colonialist says:

          Funny one hardly ever sees windmills these days. They were amazingly efficient at keeping tanks and reservoirs full, and the capital outlay was relatively small. Of course, given a downhill stream, the good old ram pump was also a marvellous way of pumping water.

          Like

          • Arkenaten says:

            The reliance on ”provided services” is one way of keeping the population economic slaves to government systems, for the benefit of a select few. Its the same story all over.
            Going ”off grid” is a dream that I would love to be able to (afford) to do.

            Like

            • colonialist says:

              Trouble is, if enough people did that they would probably introduce a tax on those not using the amenities.

              Like

              • Arkenaten says:

                I don’t believe we have to worry about that just yet, and certainly not where the majority of the population is concerned, I reckon it could be achieved and one doesn’t actually have to literally disconnect from the council facilities – lights and water, providing one is still connected then the council will only bill for what is consumed.
                I am obviously not talking about property rates and taxes.

                Like

  3. Much frustration is afoot it seems.

    Like

  4. newsferret says:

    Ah, suffering the same pool illness as we do! 😦

    Like

  5. toutparmoi says:

    Adds a whole new meaning to “getting tanked”.

    Like

  6. It makes sense to catch rain water. I’ve been in places where you had to cherish every drop.
    Although in some places city/county/state regulations don’t allow that because they say the rain doesn’t belong to a home owner, but to the community want the water to flow into a centralized spot. That seems weird to me. Even here in mosquito land, covered rain barrels catching water from roofs are reappearing.
    Drives me crazy to see the city flush fire hydrant pipes/systems and all that water flowing down a drain. We are pushing the city to reclaim all that water with one of the water trucks the city owns and use the water on the city parks and trees. It’s not an easy sell – why I don’t know why when we have droughts here.
    Nothing like a bunch of little buckets! Easy to carry.

    Like

    • colonialist says:

      I foam at the mouth when one gets these absurd rulings that a landowner doesn’t automatically own what is underground and what grows on it and what falls on it from above.
      I hope they see sense with recycling that hydrant wastage.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Yup, tanks R us. At our old house all the roof water (and it was a big roof) went into a 3000 litre underground tank, with pump and connectors on the verandah. Next door’s barn roof drained on our side into a hideous 1000 litre tank on stilts at the edge of the veggie garden. We can’t do anything like that here because it’s rented. It does rain a lot in Normandy, and two bucketsful waters all our patio plants, so we should be OK.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. disperser says:

    Looks like a lot of water out there, in the horizon.

    Like

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