Really Awful Rabbit Habit


 

Scampetty & Puff Rabbits

Scampetty and Puff from my ‘Tabika’ illustration by Lee Young

 

The English have such funny habits
And one of them’s to say
On first of month, one or more rabbits –
But white or black, not grey. 

Some claim that it averts bad luck,
And some it brings a gift,
Or if good luck one wants to pluck,
That this will give a lift. 

Some say it needs repeating twice,
Or month where ‘R’ will show,
Or top of stairs, declaiming thrice,
Or backwards downstairs go. 

Why rabbit? If you do not know
Then you need have no fear,
For no-one can a reason show
Why rabbits feature here. 

For centuries, so it is said,
Such habits have been seen –
And those who knew it are all dead,
What origins have been.

© February 2016 Colonialist (WordPress)
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About colonialist

Active septic geranium who plays with words writing fantasy novels and professionally editing, with notes writing classical music, and with riding a mountain bike, horses and dinghies.
This entry was posted in Children's Fiction, Colonialist, Fantasy, Really Awful Rhyme and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to Really Awful Rabbit Habit

  1. Better white rabbits than
    Pinch punch for the first of the month, accompanied by a quick punch in the arm

    Like

  2. Very strange indeed….you do have to wonder where this tradition began!!

    Like

  3. We always do the ‘Pinch and a punch” thing, and even though our son is almost 40, we still still fight over who manages to ‘get’ the other first. 🙂 Love you really awful ‘Wabbit’ rhyme.

    Like

  4. I haven’t white (always white) rabbited for years. Sad to forget these children’s traditions.

    Like

  5. These are the things that fascinate me about cultures other than my own! I especially love learning the stories behind what sometimes seems just plain silly!

    Like

  6. Stephanie Haahjem says:

    I can’t believe that my Granny didn’t teach me this-never heard of it! However I will NEVER put new shoes on a table, open an umbrella indoors, not touch wood when something is promising, not break two old jars if something goes wrong (to avert the dreaded “everything happens in threes)-the list goes on!!

    Like

  7. Arkenaten says:

    Must admit I’ve never heard,
    Of such a tale that’s so absurd,
    Even my time spent in Blighty,
    No time a story e’er so flighty,
    Was even once declaimed or recited,
    Hence I declare you have bull-dusted.

    😉

    Like

  8. Tom Merriman says:

    White Rabbits, Col!
    I said it just after midnight. Always have… I thought everyone said it…

    Like

  9. disperser says:

    Truly hare-raising.

    Like

  10. Pussycat44 says:

    Oi, I forgot to say “Rabbit X3, but then I’m not British or American 🙂

    Like

    • colonialist says:

      Interesting link, but strangely their references only go back to 1895 whereas it appears to have been in currency for at least three centuries. They do confirm that the reasons are not known, although there is the surmise about using it as a swearword because of the sound (does come out similarly to ‘Dammit!’ come to think of it).

      Like

  11. adeeyoyo says:

    Oy, I’ve never heard of this – must google, they seem to know almost everything, lol!

    Like

  12. Thank you again for making me grin like an idiot. It didn’t help when I said “Rabbit” aloud and Bob took off as though he were in a F1 race, which sent me into fits of giggles. He, however was not amused for he arrived back – tired and depressed to plonk down on top of my feet – ouch!

    Like

  13. Ruth2Day says:

    we used to do this religiously as kids. And now as old as I am, I get a kick out of my Dad emailing me the words “Pinch, punch . . .”

    Like

  14. newsferret says:

    And what about the English grammar asked the Katzen Jammer, do I speak to, too, two you, so i will say I speak with you. Loved the post and could not avoid the pun directed at a very difficult language that I did master, more through practice than tertiary confusion at #varsities must fall 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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