Really Awful Prefix to Suffix … er … Sapphics


This is the completion of the fence-heightening exercise.  I tried filling in the gaps, but everyone said that made it look like a construction site screen, so we'll just have to wait for the creeper to do the job.

This is the completion of the fence-heightening exercise. I tried filling in the gaps with more slats, but everyone said that made it look like a construction-site screen, so we’ll just have to wait for the creeper to do the job.

NaPoWriMo today
Says that poets all may
Do traffic with graphic
Attempts that are Sapphic,
And, therefore, I have this to say:

   Sapphic poems are such that pretention needs must

      take to the fore to the exclusion of sense;

      thus the value in them is thoroughly bust –

      be one bright or dense.*

      broken, the cadence

  *In comments on NaPoWriMo Day 12 Post, Vince Gotera quite rightly pointed out that the last line does not follow the required meter of a true-key and a ducktail.  Not to late to do a repair!  As for iffy bits which crept into the preceding part to accommodate my compulsive rhyming – they can stay!

© Colonialist April 2015 (WordPress)
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About colonialist

Active septic geranium who plays with words writing fantasy novels and professionally editing, with notes writing classical music, and with riding a mountain bike, horses and dinghies.
This entry was posted in NaPoWriMo, Personal Journal, Photography, Poems, Really Awful Rhyme, Rhyme, verse and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to Really Awful Prefix to Suffix … er … Sapphics

  1. For some arcane reason (being devoid of inspiration) I came back to this, with the idea of writing a Sapphic Ode. I read the instructions on the Napo page, but they didn’t add up:Trochee Trochee Dactyl Dactyl makes 10 syllables not 11. Then I read the example given and the rhythm sounded lumpy to me. Do you think it’s OK to cheat?

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  2. biggerthanalasagna says:

    This was hilarious! I’m so glad you were featured and I found this post!

    Like

  3. I counted the syllables and got three, maybe four stanzas that way — but as for the meter, forget it. 🙂

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  4. mahmoodsadaat says:

    Amazing, biting and insightful about the shortcomings of meter .usinng meter!

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  5. CC Champagne says:

    Brilliant!!!

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  6. I’m glad to see you had the same opinion of the form I did. I managed one verse, but had no way to follow it up. Yours takes it much less seriously than mine did, which seems to be the way to go! Congrats on being featured. 🙂

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    • colonialist says:

      I see other poets have made quite a good job of it, but it isn’t my ‘thing’!
      Thanks for congrats and for giving me the first inkling I had that I have been featured! It was utterly unexpected!

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Pingback: Day Twelve

  8. Sonel says:

    It’s going to look great with the vine all over it Col. In the meantime the girls can have fun by hanging their own flower pots there. 😀

    Don’t work too hard now you hear. How’s the leg doing?

    Like

  9. nrhatch says:

    Sounds like you’re enjoying the “challenges” of NaPoWriMo. Maybe you can do a “Don’t Fence Me In” poem? 😉

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  10. That’s a high fence. I just hope it can’t be used as a ladder. I think I might just be able to scale it. 🙂

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  11. Pussycat44 says:

    Sappho, Lesbos…… strange person, people and poetry.
    I prefer reading more about the tall fence. Plant some sweet smelling jasmine there.

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  12. That fence looks awfully high. I can just see the adventurous toddler climbing it and running out of grip at the top. I agree with your poem. Pretentious poetry is practically unreadable.

    Liked by 1 person

    • colonialist says:

      Oops – now that you mention it, I can see young 3-yr-old J having a bash. Mind you, she is good at keeping a grip on things when high up.
      I do like poetry to have a rhythm, often provided by meter and rhyme. It takes a craftsman of note to keep full sense and beauty intact within such constraints, though.

      Liked by 1 person

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